The New Zealand Mass Shooting Video Goes Viral: Major Social Media Platforms Are Unable to Handle Terrorist Content

The whole world is in terror after a horrible act of violence which took place a few days ago in New Zealand. If you haven’t heard already, here is a recap of what happened on that terrible day.

A 28-year-old Australian man named Brenton Tarrant committed a massacre in two mosques in the town Christchurch located in New Zealand. The terrorist killed 49 and wounded 42 people. While doing so, he was streaming the whole process on the social network Facebook.

Before the attack, Tarrant posted a manifesto, which was 74 pages long. In the document, the terrorist proclaimed himself an “ethno-nationalist eco-fascist.” He expressed inexplicable hate towards people of different religions, for example, Muslims and Jews, and towards immigrants who came to Australia and New Zealand.

The failure of social networks

During and after the act of terror, it became clear that social networks are unable to control such content. The 17-minute-long was first uploaded to Facebook, then re-uploaded to YouTube.

No matter how hard the developer teams tried to delete the horrific video from their platforms, they failed to do so. Whenever one copy of the video was deleted, three more popped up somewhere else.

Google (that owns YouTube) and Facebook have been applying smart technologies in order to track down and eliminate all the content related to the Christchurch massacre, however, the video can still be found in the web.

Shocking, violent and graphic content has no place on our platforms, and we are employing our technology and human resources to quickly review and remove any and all such violative content on YouTube,” claimed the representative of the platform.

The public response

People have divided into two camps. The first ones believe that such horrific content should be eliminated from the Internet. They make statements that the authorities and social media management should restrict hate speeches, manifestos of fascist nature and violent videos.

The other camp stands for freedom of speech. They also claim that the blocking of terrorist accounts on social media may make it more difficult to track them down and prevents shootings, bombings etc. For instance, the Internet correspondence of two Florida students helped to prevent another school bombing just a few days ago.

Despite many arguments, mostly everybody agrees that such terrible and unspeakably cruel acts of violence, deprived of a single hint of humanity, should never be displayed like they were during the New Zealand massacre.

Facebook and other platforms are still working hard to find and delete all the videos of the act of terror and block the corresponding accounts.

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